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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese. found in the catalog.

Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese.

James Rodney Wenger

Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese.

by James Rodney Wenger

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Published by University Microfilms International in Ann Arbor, Mich .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Photocopy of a Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of Arizona, 1982.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13955524M

On p. [4] of cover: Some aspects of honorific expressions, in special reference to discourse. Text in Japanese, with summary in English. Description: [4], pages ; 21 cm. Series Title: Kokuritsu Kokugo Kenkyūjo hōkoku, Other Titles: Some aspects of honorific expressions: Responsibility: Kokuritsu Kokugo Kenkyūjo hen. The Japanese language uses a broad array of honorific suffixes for addressing or referring to people, for example -san, as in honorifics are gender-neutral (can be used for males and females), though some are more used for men or women (-kun is primarily used for males, while -chan is primarily used for women) and can be attached to first names as well as surnames, for example.

In linguistics, an honorific (abbreviated HON) is a grammatical or morphosyntactic form that encodes the relative social status of the participants of the conversation. Distinct from honorific titles, linguistic honorifics convey formality FORM, social distance, politeness POL, humility HBL, deference, or respect through the choice of an alternate form such as an affix, clitic, grammatical.   Meme Status Confirmed Type: Slang Year Unknown Origin Japanese language Tags japanese honorifics, japan, anime, manga, chan, sempai, san, sama, kun, sensei Additional References Wikipedia About. Japanese Honorifics are suffixes used in Japanese language to address or refer to different types of people. They are often used online by anime or Japanese culture fans.

As a result, young Japanese have a poor command of honorific language and do not feel compelled to use it. “There’s confusion and embarrassment,” said Rika Oshima, the year-old president of Speaking Essay, a school that instructs new employees on the use of honorific language. Honorifics are a feature of Japanese language that have been creeping into English dubs and which are frequently carried over intact and unannotated in subtitles. Honorifics are the Japanese equivalent of "Mister", "Mrs.", "Doctor" and the like, except that there are far more of them with far more nuances of meaning than there are in English. They are employed as suffixes to names ('-san') or.


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Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese by James Rodney Wenger Download PDF EPUB FB2

INFORMATION TO USERS This reproduction was made from a copy of a document sent to us for microfilming. While the most advanced technology has been used to photograph and reproduce. Japanese Honorifics Honorifics are not a grammatical matter, so you won’t find any solid chapter on them in a Japanese grammar book.

Knowing what they are is very important to understanding Japanese culture. Especially in regards to the Japanese sense of politeness and accepted behavior. The Japanese language has many honorifics, referred to as keigo (敬語, literally "respectful language"), parts of speech that show use is mandatory in many social situations.

Honorifics in Japanese may be used to emphasize social distance or disparity in rank, or to emphasize social intimacy or similarity in rank. () Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Arizona.

Wenger, James R ()  Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese. Ph.D. dissertation, University of by: propose a theory of honorifics based on the universal principles of syntax and demonstrate that the study of honorifics, which is traditionally considered as a Japanese-specific phenomenon or sociolinguistic phenomenon, can make some contributions to the study of I-language (Chomsky a).

Pizziconi: Japanese honorifics and the cultural specificity of a universal mechanism 12 themselves vis-à-vis some object of reference and their interlocutor. Japanese: A story of language and people. Some putative universals of honorific systems.

Paper, Honorifics Conference, Portland OR. Some universals of honorific language with special reference to Japanese.

PhD. Diss., University of Arizona. Greenberg's Language Universals is typical of his typological-theoretical work in its stunning originality.

Starting out from the observations underlying Praguian markedness, Greenberg contributes a mass of new data and generalizations and lays the foundations for a post-structuralist, usage-based theory of grammatical asymmetries.

This work will continue to be influential for many years to come. As an example, Japanese kenjōgo (謙譲語) is a set of honorific forms that lower the speaker’s status, thereby raising the referent’s status by comparison. [ja] いたす itasu, いたします itashimasu (to do; when referring to one’s own actions or the actions of a group member) References.

Brown, Penelope and Stephen C. Levinson. Japanese for All Occasions explains how Japanese conversation is carried out in different social settings, with attention to the speech styles used.

From casual to honorific, each style has its own level of politeness and rules of word formation. With this book, intermediate-level students will learn how to speak in ways that are appropriate to a variety of situations, from informal chats with Reviews:   If you are an intermediate student, the book will help put together the keigo (honorific language) for you in a big-picture sense, including the "donative" verbs (kureru/kudasaru, etc.), which can be very confusing.

The book does not contain exercises but has a Reviews: 6. Comrie first introduced the different axes honorifics can refer to: the addressee (who is addressed by the reference), to the utterance referent (who the utterance is about), the bystander of the discourse (who might be overhearing the utterance) or to a taboo person in general regardless of the discourse.

All of these can occur lexically. Honorifics play a huge role in the Japanese language. They define underlying power dynamics and help the speaker express deference to the listener without being explicit. It is the one area of the language where it is as essential to understand the culture as is.

Japanese honorifics are a very complex system of addressing other people, much like the “Mr.” and “Ms.” or the “Sir” and “Madame” we use, with the added complexity of having more than thirty different forms. Honorifics are not a grammatical matter, so you won’t find any solid chapter on them in a Japanese grammar book.

The Japanese language makes use of honorific suffixes when referring to others in a conversation. These suffixes are attached to the end of names, and are often gender-specific.

Honorific suffixes also indicate the level of the speaker and referred individual's relationship and are often used alongside other components of Japanese honorific speech, called keigo (敬語.

The Japanese language accommodates several levels of politeness through different verb endings and alternative expressions and words.

There are three general levels of politeness, which are expressed through different kinds of speech. The levels correspond to colloquial, polite and honorific situations. Introduction Rules of Japanese Honorific Prefixes Frequent Expressions.

Introduction. When learning the Japanese respectful speech called Keigo, the attention is often focused on verbs construction and the social relations between a speaker and a r, Keigo covers more than set expressions and situational examples, and in particular Japanese uses Honorific Prefixes.

Judul Kode 1 Rich Lexicons and Restrictive Grammars – Maximum Likelihood Learning in Op. PDF | On Jan 1,Shigeko Okamoto published Situated Politeness: Manipulating Honorific And Non-Honorific Expressions In Japanese Conversations | Find, read and cite all the research you need.

Japanese is definitely much more complex than Chinese it its grammar especially when it comes to honorific language. There are several levels, if I can remember and the choice of which one to use is affected by things like the age and social position of the person that one is talking with.We will write a custom Research Paper on Language and Culture: The Honorifics (Speech or System) of Japanese and Korean specifically for you for only $ $11/page.

certified writers online.Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. Book: All Authors / Contributors: Gary Dean Prideaux. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: # Japanese language -- Honorific\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0.